All posts by Joyce Bayona

Policy making in the Tanzanian petro state: Building a statistical basis

This paper deals with needs and availability of data, statistics and information in Tanzania. It relates to a five-year (2014–19) research programme on prospects and challenges for the petroleum sector.

The main objectives are

  • to present a brief analysis based on data which is accessible at present and
  • to sketch a structure for the Tanzania Petro Data Hub

To read the paper click here.

Understanding the lay of the land: An institutional analysis of petro-governance in Tanzania

Tanzania has recently discovered large petroleum and natural gas reserves, boosting its natural resource stocks and potential future revenue flows. Whether the country’s petroleum resources will translate into economic development will be determined by the institutions that the government puts into place to govern the petroleum sector, to include the legal institutions. This study reviews the most important provisions of the new legislative framework that the government has recently adopted to govern this newfound wealth. We examine the institutions and actors created by the legislation as well as the opportunities and challenges that may emerge in its future implementation. Specifically, we analyse the petro-sector institutions that the legislation creates and the types of authorities granted to them; the institutional constraints placed on authorities; the interaction between institutions; potential institutional overlaps, conflicts and gaps; and transparency and accountability mechanisms. Read the paper here

Governance challenges in Tanzania’s natural gas sector: unregulated lobbyism and uncoordinated policy

Fjeldstad, Odd-Helge and Johnsøn, Jesper. 2017. Governance challenges in Tanzania’s natural gas sector: unregulated lobbyism and uncoordinated policy. Chapter 3 (pp. 44-57) in Aled Williams and Philippe le Billon (eds.) Corruption, natural resources and development: from resource curse to political ecology. Edward Elgar Publishing. http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/corruption-naturalresources-and-development

HOW CAN TANZANIA HARNESS NATURAL RESOURCES: TRAINING

Organised and delivered by REPOA and Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) from 03 to 07 July 2017 at REPOA, Dar es Salaam. The training was a hands-on “learning from practice” workshop that focused on building the understanding of the links between, and the dynamics of, extractives governance and the implementation of the Second Five-Year Development Plan (FYDP II). The training aimed to improve participants’ knowledge of not only policy options and tools to achieving the objectives of the plan, but of also the inherent challenges…read more here

Strategic Positioning of a NOC in the context of the new regulatory and the operating environment

On September 28, Dr. Donald Mmari (REPOA) and Prof. Sufian Bukurura (Law Reform Commission of Tanzania) presented their work on the strategic positioning of a NOC in the context of the new regulatory and the operating environment.

prof-bukururu-interview
There was wide media coverage of Dr. Donald Mmari and Professor Sufian Bukurura’s presentation. Prof. Bukurura here interviewed by journalists. Photo: Joyce Bayona

 

The presentation is available here: Strategic positioning of a NOC in the context of the new regulatory and the operating environment

 

Strategic Significance of National Oil Companies: Lessons for Tanzania

This paper examines the genesis of national oil companies (NOCs) and the political economy underpinning the diverse forms in which they are structured and operate. It also examines how they contribute to the development needs of the countries that have established them. The paper draws mainly from a desk review of relevant literature, institutional records and interviews from selected knowledgeable informants, and it aims to promote informed dialogue on this subject that has caught the attention of stakeholders in Tanzania in recent years following the discovery of a substantial amount of natural gas in the deep sea. The underlying proposition is that the benefits of hydrocarbon to the country can be maximized when a NOC exists, but it must operate within a robust institutional framework. As the case studies demonstrate, the robustness of the institutional framework, in turn, depends on the historical trajectory, broader institutional landscape and political economy underpinning the country’s development path. The authors argue that the Tanzanian NOC has vast potential for contributing to economic transformation in the country given the vast hydrocarbon resources, provided that the proper institutional and policy conditions are put in place.

The report Strategic Significance of National Oil Companies: Lessons for Tanzania is available here